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Recently we have installed 50 Tons / Day capacity new Ice Pant.

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DYCROPULP Dyes for Paper

 
DIRECT DYES
Sr.No. Shades DYCROPULP Direct Dyes C.I.NAME CAS NO.
1
 
PAPER YELLOW T DIRECT YELLOW 11  
2
 
ORANGE SE DIRECT ORANGE 26 3626-36-6
3 Wool dyes   DIRECT ORANGE 15  
4 Metal Complex dyes ORANGE WS DIRECT ORANGE 102  
5
 
FAST SCARLET 4BS DIRECT RED 23 3441-14-3
6
 
RED 5BL DIRECT RED 81  
7 RED CAS-N DIRECT RED 239  
8
 
PINK 3B (SF) DIRECT RED 254  
9   DIRECT RED 6  
10
 
  DIRECT RED 236  
11
 
VIOLET MB DIRECT VIOLET 9  
12 VIOLET BB DIRECT VIOLET 35  
13 SKY BLUE FF DIRECT BLUE 15  
14
 
T. BLUE SBL DIRECT BLUE 86  
15 Fabric dyes TURQUOISE FB DIRECT BLUE 199  
16 Textile dyes   DIRECT BLUE AC  
17 BLUE 2R DIRECT BLUE 290  
17 BLACK VB DIRECT BLACK 19  
18
 
BLACK B 7 DIRECT BLACK 155  
19
 
BLACK AR DIRECT BLACK 168  
 
ACID DYES
Sr. No. Shades DYCROPULP Acid Dyes C.I.NAME CAS NO.
1
 
CYANINE BLUE R  ACID BLUE 92 3861-73-2
2
 
GREEN PXE ACID GREEN 1 19381-50-1
3
 
GREEN N ACID GREEN 20 5850-39-5
4
 
DYEGOSOL PINK IR ACID RED 1 3734-67-6
5
 
FAST RED A ACID RED 88 1658-56-6
6 Red B2G ACID RED 97 10169-2-5
7
RED 3BN ACID RED 131 12234-99-0
8 VIOLET M4R ACID VIOLET 12  
9 ORANGE 2GL ACID ORANGE 10  
10 Brown R ACID ORANGE 51  
11
 
METANIL YELLOW R ACID YELLOW 36 587-98-4
 
Basic Dyes
Sr. No. SHADES DYCROPULP Basic Dyes C.I.NAME CAS NO.
1 AUROMINE O CONC BASIC YELLOW 2  
2 CRYSODINE Y & R BASIC ORANGE 2  
3 METHELENE BLUE PDR WITH ZINC
& ZINC FREE
BASIC BLUE 9  
4 BISMARK BROWN Y & R BASIC BROWN 4  
5 MELCHITE GREEN XLS/PDR LIQUID BASIC GREEN 4  
6 METHEYL VIOLET CSTL/PDR D BASIC VIOLET 1  
7 CRYSTAL VIOLET CSTL/PDR LIQUID BASIC VIOLET 3  
8 ETHYEL VIOLET CSTL/PDR LIQUID BASIC VIOLET 4  
9 RHODAMINE B 550% BASIC VIOLET 10  
Basic dye is a stain that is cationic (+ ve charged) and so will react with material that is (-ve) negatively charged. The cytoplasm of all bacterial cells have a slight negative charge when grown in a medium of near neutral pH and will therefore attract and bind with basic dyes. Some examples of basic dyes are crystal violet, safranin, basic fuchsin and methylene blue. It’s applied to wool, silk, cotton and modified acrylic fibres. Usually acetic acid is added to the dyebath to help the take up of the dye onto the fibre. Basic dyes are also used in the coloration of paper.

Basic dye is a class of dyes, usually synthetic, that act as bases, and which are actually aniline dyes. Their color base is not water soluble but can be made so by converting the base into a salt. The basic dyes, while possessing great tinctorial strength and brightness, are not generally light-fast; therefore their use in the dyeing of archival materials is largely restricted to those materials not requiring this characteristic. Basic dyes were at one time used extensively in dyeing leather, mainly because they are capable of combining directly with vegetable-tanned leather without the use of a mordant. Basic dyes show virtually no migration in acrylic fibers under normal dyeing conditions, compatibility is of major importance in selecting dye combinations with optimum level dyeing behavior.

Basic dyes possess cationic functional groups such as -NR3+ or =NR2+. The name 'basic dye' refers to when these dyes were still used to dye wool in an alkaline bath. Protein in basic conditions develops a negative charge as the -COOH groups are deprotonated to give -COO-. In an electric field the chromophore ion travels to the cathode or negative pole; it is positively charged. Generally forms salts with negatively charged (acidic) substances in tissue (chromatin, ergastoplasm, cartilage matrix, some granules). Affinity for such dyes, is called basophilia. Basic dyes perform poorly on natural fibres, but work very well on acrylics.

The most common anionic group attached to acrylic polymers is the sulphonate group, -SO3-, closely followed by the carboxylate group, -CO2-. These are either introduced as a result of co-polymerisation, or as the residues of anionic polymerisation inhibitors. It is this anionic property which makes acrylics suitable for dyeing with cationic dyes, since there will be a strong ionic interaction between dye and polymer (in effect, the opposite of the acid dye-protein fibre interaction).
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